ImpulsBauhaus

by Andreas Wolter, Jens Weber.

As the year marking the 90th anniversary of the establishment of the Bauhaus, 2009 is an appropriate year for an exhibition dedicated to the examination of the social networks of the Bauhaus movement. In preparation for this project, biographical details of all of the members of the Bauhaus will be systematically structured and entered into an online database. The impressive volume of information resulting from this effort will then be presented within an illuminated 4x4meter cube at the Bauhaus University in Weimar.

The exhibition then becomes an immersive yet highly-structured digital archive rich with historical details. Complex interrelationships will be made more accessible through the implementation of an innovative graphical interface. All visualizations of the complex network are drawn directly from the research database and presented in an intuitive computer-generated form. At an interactive digital tabletop, spectators can furthermore examine individual parts of the greater network in more detail.

http://www.open-output.org/jewe/project/6168

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Compath

GPS, video camera mounted on a vehicle fitted with a fisheye lens, a microphone attached to the data collected before and after the vehicle was rebuilt as an installation space in a way consistent with the actual direction.

The data: collected by GPS, Fish-eye lens mounted video camera, microphones that put on the car. They are reconstructed as an installation. The direction in the video and real-space are synchronized.

http://counteraktiv.com/wrk/cmp/

Inivisible Cities

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By revealing the social networks present within the urban environment, Invisible Cities describes a new kind of city—a city of the mind. It displays geocoded activity from online services such as Twitter and Flickr, both in real-time and in aggregate. Real-time activity is represented as individual nodes that appear whenever a message or image is posted. Aggregate activity is reflected in the underlying terrain: over time, the landscape warps as data is accrued, creating hills and valleys representing areas with high and low densities of data.

http://www.christianmarcschmidt.com/invisiblecities/

Twingly Screensaver

The Twingly screensaver visualizes lobal blog activity in real time, giving you a 24/7 stream of all (viewer discretion advised) blog activity, straight to your screen. To use the screensaver you need a PC with Windows and a graphics card supporting OpenGL.

True size of Africa – Infoviz project

Online maps that we use for directions use the Mercator projection, and this tends to dictate how we perceive the size of countries and continents. If you look at the world map on Google, for example, Africa doesn’t look that much bigger compared to China or the United States. In reality though, it’s a lot bigger. Kai Krause scales countries by their area in square kilometers and then fits them into a Africa’s borders for some perspective.

http://flowingdata.com/2010/10/18/true-size-of-africa/

The World’s Facebook Relationships Visualized – Dataviz project

Facebook intern Paul Butler was interested in the locations of friendships, so he decided to create a visualization of Facebook connections around the globe. How local are our friends? Where are the highest concentration of friendships? How do political and geological boundaries affect them?

Butler started by using a sample of 10 million friend pairs, correlated them with their current cities and then mapped that data using the longitude and latitude of each city.

http://mashable.com/2010/12/13/facebook-members-visualization/

World Processor – Ingo Günther / Infoviz project

Worldprocessor is an interesting project started on 1988 by the anthropologist and artist Ingo Günther. Ingo creates beautiful globes by representing on them different kinds of information in a visually appealing way. Exhibitions of the globes have been done all around the world. More information about the globes below and many others can be found in his  catalogue or in his blog, where he posts photos of the globes regularly. The works are also published on an artistic book.

http://worldprocessor.com/catalog/world/

http://sciencescapes.co.uk/2010/11/03/worldprocessor-by-ingo-gunther/

Life expectancy is a core factor in the human development index. With 82 years Japan has the highest life expectancy. All 35 countries at the bottom of this list are located in sub-Saharan Africa; their citizen's average life expectancy is between 52 and 39 years.

Personas

Personas uses sophisticated natural language processing and the Internet to create a data portrait of one’s aggregated online identity. In short, Personas shows you how the Internet sees you.

Sabin+Jones

Within the Sabin+Jones LabStudio, architects, mathematicians, materials scientists and cell biologists are actively collaborating to develop, analyze and abstract dynamic, biological systems through the generation and design of new tools. These new approaches for modeling complexity and visualizing large datasets are subsequently applied to both architectural and biomedical research and design.

http://www.sabin-jones.com/

Travel Itineraries from Flickr

Automatic Construction of Travel Itineraries using Social Breadcrumbs

From the abstract:

Vacation planning is one of the frequent—but nonetheless laborious—tasks that people engage themselves with online; requiring skilled interaction with a multitude of resources. This paper constructs intra-city travel itineraries automatically by tapping a latent source reflecting geo-temporal breadcrumbs left by millions of tourists. For example, the popular rich media sharing site, Flickr, allows photos to be stamped by the time of when they were taken and be mapped to Points Of Interests (POIs) by geographical (i.e. latitudelongitude) and semantic (e.g., tags) metadata.

Leveraging this information, we construct itineraries following a two-step approach. Given a city, we first extract photo streams of individual users. Each photo stream provides estimates on where the user was, how long he stayed at each place, and what was the transit time between places. In the second step, we aggregate all user photo streams into a POI graph. Itineraries are then automatically constructed from the graph based on the popularity of the POIs and subject to the user’s time and destination constraints.

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